Wednesday, November 22, 2006

Pro-Life Fundraising Ideas

This idea came from both a bake sale I had at this past year's Relay for Life (to benefit the American Cancer Society) and from a post over at Sluts4Choice. To counter our opponents fundraising efforts, I propose having a Bakesale for Life on your local college campus, to raise procedes for either a CPC or a pro-life organization of your choosing. Or it'd be cool if we could find out the specific campus the person is wanting to have their bakesale at and set up a booth right next to theirs. Mwahaha ;) :)
Well, getting back to the idea: We all know that college students crave home-baked goodies and many don't have much money to go by. In addition to baked goods, this would be a good opportunity to offer life-affirming informational pamplets such as fetal development, abortion statistics, pregnancy loss (healing from an abortion or miscarriage), local community resources (domestic violence/rape, food, shelter, etc.) and information on pregnancy/parenting resources such as your local pregnancy resource center, The Nurturing Network, America's Pregnancy Helpline, and Feminists for Life for example. But make sure to check with your college's student activities office (or equivelent) for policies and procedures for setting up and running a booth on campus.
Another idea is to sell tickets for and host a volunteer-run, fundraiser dinner. A fish fry or spegettti dinner are two commonly chosen ones because of thier relative ease to put together and low cost. And you may be able to host it at a local Knights of Columbus, Kiwanas Club, or church. But be sure to check with your local health department for guildelines.
Also, just learned about the Wash for Life. "We are organizing thousands of groups across the nation to hold car washes to benefit their local pregnancy care centers - all on the same day! By participating in the Wash for Life, youth will help women and children in their own community, while at the same time being united in an event that sends a message to the whole nation, that this generation is pro-life."
Another idea is that we could do our own "Pledge-A-Picket" for any pro-choicers picketers at a pregnancy resource center, a Silent No More Awareness event, pro-life college booth, etc. The whole idea behind Pledge-a-Picket is to have people adopt a picketer and pledge a level of support for a picketer they "adopt." Then those contributions come rolling in every time these people are out on the street. The funds could then be used to support an existing pro-life organization, such as as your local pregnancy resource center, Heartbeat Interntional, Birthright, The Nuturing Network, or America's Pregnancy Helpline, for example or used to help you start your own organization.

Thursday, November 16, 2006

About Depression and Other Mental Health Disorders

Introduction:
Who are we? We are your neighbors, your fellow church members, your co-workers, maybe even a family member. We are persons with a mental illness. We have been called lazy, selfish, weak-minded, crazies, and even subhuman among other things by individuals around us. There are those who are still frightened of us and/or walk on egg shells around us. Although there is progress being made in awareness and education, there are still many stereotypes and misconceptions about our illness. This entry is about education and awarness, about fighting the misconceptions and stigmas surrounding mental illness.

What is Mental Illness?
Mental illness is defined by SAMHSA's National Mental Health Information Center as "Mental illness is any diagnosable mental, behavioral, or emotional disorder that interferes with or limits a person's ability to live, work, learn, and participate fully in his or her community. Mental illness includes disorders such as depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, panic disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism, and Alzheimer's disease. Mental illness involves the body, mood, and thoughts. It affects the way a person thinks, eats, sleeps, and feels about him/herself. Mental illness is not a sign of personal weakness or lack of willpower. People with a mental illness cannot simply overcome it and get better on their own."
According to National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI)
  • Mental illnesses include such disorders as schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic and other severe anxiety disorders, autism and pervasive developmental disorders, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, borderline personality disorder, and other severe and persistent mental illnesses that affect the brain.
  • Mental illnesses can affect persons of any age, race, religion, or income. Mental illnesses are not the result of personal weakness, lack of character, or poor upbringing.
  • Mental illnesses are biologically based brain disorders. They cannot be overcome through "will power" and are not related to a person's "character" or intelligence.
  • Mental disorders fall along a continuum of severity. The most serious and disabling conditions affect five to ten million adults (2.6 – 5.4%) and three to five million children ages five to seventeen (5 – 9%) in the United States.
How is It Treated?
Also, according to National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI)
"Mental illnesses are treatable. Most people with serious mental illness need medication to help control symptoms, but also rely on supportive counseling, self-help groups, assistance with housing, vocational rehabilitation, income assistance and other community services in order to achieve their highest level of recovery. The best treatments for serious mental illnesses today are highly effective; between 70 and 90 percent of individuals have significant reduction of symptoms and improved quality of life with a combination of pharmacological and psychosocial treatments and supports. Early identification and treatment is of vital importance; By getting people the treatment they need early, recovery is accelerated and the brain is protected from further harm related to the course of illness. Without treatment the consequences of mental illness for the individual and society are staggering: unnecessary disability, unemployment, substance abuse, homelessness, inappropriate incarceration, suicide and wasted lives; The economic cost of untreated mental illness is more than 100 billion dollars each year in the United States. "
Now I will be narrowing my focus here to depressive disorders and suicide.

What is a Depressive Disorder?
The National Institute for Mental Healthdefines a depressive disorder as, "an illness that involves the body, mood, and thoughts. It affects the way a person eats and sleeps, the way one feels about oneself, and the way one thinks about things. A depressive disorder is not the same as a passing blue mood. It is not a sign of personal weakness or a condition that can be willed or wished away. People with a depressive illness cannot merely "pull themselves together" and get better. Without treatment, symptoms can last for weeks, months, or years. Appropriate treatment, however, can help most people who suffer from depression."
And according to the Depression and Bipolar Alliance, "Depression is a treatable illness involving an imbalance of brain chemicals called neurotransmitters. It is not a character flaw or a sign of personal weakness. You can’t make yourself well by trying to "snap out of it." Although it can run in families, you can’t catch it from someone else. The direct causes of the illness are unclear, however it is known that body chemistry can bring on a depressive disorder, due to experiencing a traumatic event, hormonal changes, altered health habits, the presence of another illness or substance abuse."
Some Statistics:
According to the National Institute of Mental Health...
  • Approximately 20.9 million adults, or about 9.5 percent of the U.S. population age 18 and older in a given year, have a mood disorder. (1)
  • The median age of onset for mood disorder is 30 years (5).
  • Depressive disorders often co-occur with anxiety disorders and substance abuse (5).
        Major Depressive Disorder
  • Major Depressive Disorder is the leading cause of disability in the U.S. for ages 15-44(3).
  • Major depressive disorder affects approximately 14.8 million American adults, or about 6.7 percent of the U.S. population age 18 and older in a given year (1)
  • While major depressive disorder can develop at any age, the median age at onset is 32(5).
  • Major depressive disorder is more prevalent in women than in men (6).
        Dysthymic Disorder
  • Symptoms of dysthymic disorder (chronic, mild depression) must persist for at least two years in adults (one year in children) to meet criteria for the diagnosis.
  • Dysthymic disorder affects approximately 1.5 percent of the U.S. population age 18 and older in a given year(1). This figure translates to about 3.3 million American adults(2).
  • The median age of onset of dysthymic disorder is 31(1).
        Bipolar Disorder
  • Bipolar disorder affects approximately 5.7 million American adults, or about 2.6 percent of the U.S. population age 18 and older in a given year(1).
  • The median age of onset for bipolar disorders is 25 years(5).
What are the Symptoms of a Depressive Disorder?
Not everyone who is depressed or manic experiences every symptom. Some people experience a few symptoms, some many. Severity of symptoms varies with individuals and also varies over time.

Depression

  • Persistent sad, anxious, or "empty" mood
  • Feelings of hopelessness, pessimism
  • Feelings of guilt, worthlessness, helplessness
  • Loss of interest or pleasure in hobbies and activities that were once enjoyed, including sex
  • Decreased energy, fatigue, being "slowed down"
  • Difficulty concentrating, remembering, making decisions
  • Insomnia, early-morning awakening, or oversleeping
  • Appetite and/or weight loss or overeating and weight gain
  • Thoughts of death or suicide; suicide attempts
  • Restlessness, irritability
  • Persistent physical symptoms that do not respond to treatment, such as headaches, digestive disorders, and chronic pain

Mania

  • Abnormal or excessive elation
  • Unusual irritability
  • Decreased need for sleep
  • Grandiose notions
  • Increased talking
  • Racing thoughts
  • Increased sexual desire
  • Markedly increased energy
  • Poor judgment
  • Inappropriate social behavior
What Does It Feel Like?
Unless you've studied pyschology at a college level or experienced it first hand, the average person probably doesn't know what it's like to experience depression. The following article relates the feelings and perspectives of one person who's experienced depression, with hundreds of others also contributing their experiences in the comment section:
http://blogs.wingofmadness.com/feel/index.php

How is it Treated?

What Causes a Person to Attempt Suicide?
According to this website:  Start by considering this statement, “Suicide is not chosen; it happens when pain exceeds resources for coping with pain.”  Well, let's take what we already know, persons with a depressive disorder or substance addiction are experiencing some degree of emotional pain or turmoil. And every person has a different amount of coping resources. Now back to what the website says: "When pain exceeds pain-coping resources, suicidal feelings are the result. Suicide is neither wrong nor right; it is not a defect of character; it is morally neutral. It is simply an imbalance of pain versus coping resources."

Some Statistics:
According to the National Institute of Mental Health...
  • In 2002, 31,655 (approximately11 per 100,000) people died by suicide in the U.S. (7, 8).
  • More than 90 percent of people who kill themselves have a diagnosable mental disorder, most commonly a depressive disorder or substance abuse disorder(9).
  • The highest suicide rates in the U.S. are found in white men over age 85(8).
  • Four times as many men as women die by suicide(8); however, women attempt suicide two to three times as often as men(10).
What Can be Done About This?
Indiana's state suicide prevention plan is a good example of a state-wide plan, based on a multi-pronged approach of 1.)Awareness, 2.)Intervention, and 3.)Methodology
On an individual level, there are things you can do as well:
According to the Indiana Suicide Prevention Coalition:
Step 1: Learn to recognize the warning signs of suicide.

Step 2: If you suspect someone you know is depressed and suicidal or could be suicidal, approach that person. Talk openly about depression and suicide and ask directly about whether the person in distress is thinking about suicide. Listen and affirm their feelings. Do not judge or debate whether feelings are right or wrong and don't tell them or imply that they are wrong but do help them explore positive ways to solve their problems.

Step 3: Be available and show interest and support for their situation.

Step 4: Remove any means of suicide such as guns, ropes, knives and pills from their home. Assist them to get help from mental health or crisis intervention experts by calling or taking them to their family physician, your local mental health center, the behavioral health / psychiatric units or emergency departments of their local community hospital or call a national suicide hotline such as 1-800-273-TALK for further information.

Sources:
1) National Institute of Mental Health
Fact Sheet (reviewed 2006)
The Numbers Count: Mental Disorders in America
http://www.nimh.nih.gov/publicat/numbers.cfm

2(National Alliance on Mental Illness
About Mental Illness
http://www.nami.org/Content/NavigationMenu/Inform_Yourself/About_Mental_Illness/About_Mental_Illness.htm


Suggestions for Support People:
DBSA Educational Materials
Free online brochures with information on a number of mood disorder-related topics. Note: Some come in PDF format and requireAdobe Acrobat Reader
http://www.dbsalliance.org/bookstore/brochures.html

What to Do When Someone You Know is Depressed
http://www.wingofmadness.com/articles/someone.htm

Is Someone You Love Depressed?
http://www.hbcprotocols.com/someoneyoulove.html

If You Know Someone Who's Depressed
http://www.healthyplace.com/communities/depression/living/ifyouknow.htm

What to Do When a Friend is Depressed
A helpful guide for teenagers
http://www.hoptechno.com/book34.htm

The 23 Best Things to Say to Someone Who is Depressed
http://www.hbcprotocols.com/23best.html

The 99 Worst Things to Say to Someone Who is Depressed
http://www.hbcprotocols.com/99things.html

Worst Things to Say to Someone Who is Depressed
http://www.wingofmadness.com/information/worst_things.htm


Additional Mental Health Resources

Tuesday, November 14, 2006

Let Us Be Thoughtful and Thankful

Thanksgiving is right around the corner, and with it a time for us to consciously stop and consider all that we have to be thankful for. Although we live in a world full of tragedies and evil, there also lies goodness. I'm going to list what I'm thankful for here, in subsequent days leading up to Thanksgiving. It will be a challenge, indeed, but a good one, because thankfulness is a discipline that requires most of all the ability to see the good things all around us. I hope you'll join in and let me know what you're thankful for by posting in the comments section.
1. Freedom: to practice the religion of my choosing or not practice at all, the right to work, and the right to have a voice and vote
2. My Family: although we may not always see eye to eye as I am becoming an independent adult, I still will always love you
3. My Grandparents and also neighbor "Richard C.": You Have Much Insight and Wisdom to Pass On
4. To be Alive: Two life-threatening medical emergencies arose this year for myself and yet here I am. I'm glad to be alive and in good health.
5. My Best Friends: You know who you are. Thank you for being there through the hard times and by my side to laugh through the good times.
6. My Best Friend and the Love of My Life, "B": I just want to let you know that I love you very much. We've been through some hard times together, but we've made it though. You truly are my guardian angel. Thank you for being there through the hard times and by my side to laugh through the good times.
7. Food on the Table
8. Clothing and Shoes to Wear
9. A Higher Power Looking Out for My Health and Safety
10. Having a Job which I Enjoy and Pays the Bills
11. My Supervisor and the People I Work With...Even the Difficult Ones
12. Chocolate
13. A Car that Runs: Despite it's age (10 yrs), my car runs with little trouble.
14. Our Two Cats: They've brought us companionship, comfort, and laughter, they're practically members of our family
15. Indoor Plumbing/Electricity
16. Experiences Which Let me Walk in Others Shoes and Keeps Me Humble
17. Hot Chocolate and Warm, Soft, Chocolate Chip Cookies
18. Finding Wonderful Friendship and Support During Difficult Emotional Times
19. Thoughtful and Insightful Conversations with "B"s Mother
20. Good Books Which Comfort, Inspire, Make Me Think, and Entertain
21. A Home Which is Safe and Protects Me from the Weather
22. Discounts on Clothes and Books
23. Family Christmas Gatherings at my Grandparent's When I Was a Child
24. Fires in Our Fireplace on Cold Autumn/Winter Nights
25. To Have Gotten to Know my Stepgrandfather, "Darwin" Before He Died.
26. My Teachers: I've had some truly dedicated, patient, and caring teachers throughout my years in school, particularly Jerry E. and Sally L.
27. Computers: They simplify our way of life
28. Light through the Darkness: Finally overcoming years of clinical depression
29. Art Which Inspires: Having the spiritual guidance and inspiration of my aunt as I finished a chalk drawing, which she began years ago. And having inherited her artisitic talent. We love you and miss you, Mary Margaret.
30. Mr. Fred Rogers: You've been an inspiration to my creativity and helped me to grow. Thank you, Mr. Rogers
32. Sleeping Babies: The tranquility which comes with holding a peacefully sleeping baby.
33. Fingerpainting and Watercolors: Memories of my childhood
34. Quiet Moments
35. Our Firefighters and the Men and Women Serving Our Country
36. Minimal Traffic on the Interstate Highway
37. ...and Safe Arrivals For Myself, My Friends, and My Family at Their Destinations
38. Kisses and Hugs
39. T.V. Remote Controls
40. Getting to Sleep In On the Occasional Weekend
41. Accomplishments Which Make my Parents and Family Proud
42. Two Words: Star...Wars
43. Snow: Catching snowflakes on my tongue and rolling snowmen
44. Wildlife Refuges
45. Sunsets at the beach


Original Comments Made for This Entry...

CatS. wrote (11-15-2006):
Rachael, Your blog warmed my heart. You truly have a thankful heart and have the ability to express your blessings in such a pure way. I only have a few minutes to respond but will spend more time giving thought to my abundant blessings. I am thankful that God has blessed me with three incredible daughters, all three so unique, and all with good hearts, good minds and healthy bodies. I am thankful for a kind, patient and thoughtful husband that was truly meant to be my life partner. I am thankful for loving parents and my wholesome childhood. But most importantly, this year I am thankful that you can feel that you are blessed, you can feel the love of others and you can enjoy life once again.

Thursday, November 2, 2006

Two Lives Saved by Sidewalk Counseling

Dawn Eden brings us the news about a young woman who spoke to the Waco, Texas, City Council in defense of pro-life street counselors who encouraged her not to have an abortion:
The council went on to ease its restrictions against demonstrations outside abortion clinics.

On a busy day at an inner city abortion clinic, you may find both anti-abortion protestors and clinic escorts. Legally both the sidewalk counselors and the picketers have the legal right to express their views under the first amendement. However, there are certain laws which do limit their access and proximity to the clinics. However, that's not what I'm wanting to focus on here. Today, I'd like to discuss the role of sidewalk counselors. There's a lot of assumptions that they're the same as the picketers. Actually, there is a difference in presentation and demeanor between sidewalk counselors and picketers and their goals are different. I think a lot of folks don't understand who these sidewalk counselors are and what they are there to accomplish. The sidewalk counselors are there to offer information on alternatives, resources for pregnancy and parenting, caution clients against going to a shody clinic (which has malpractice and negligence suits), and support to a woman considering having an abortion.

"How is a frightened woman on her way into a clinic for an procedure supposed to tell the difference between a "counselor" and a "picketer"?"

That's a good question. Usually counselors are offering informational pamplets and not loud or obnoxious, although they may call to the woman to get her attention. They also have a different goal, not to scare or intimidate, only to offer alternatives to abortion and also to director her to resources which can assist her.  Picketers on the other hand, primary try to intimidate and shock women into not choosing abortion. And while I disagree with many of the picketer's methods (i.e. bloody photos or screaming words of condemnation), there are protestors who make a quiet prescence with just prayerHere's an interview with a protestor. Oftentimes, I think individuals and groups mix up the two groups and assume the worse about sidewalk counselors without actually getting to know them on an individual basis. They just may have more in common goal-wise than they know.

It is up to every individual woman whether or not she'd like to speak with the sidewalk counselors, and especially if you're not sure about your decision, I'd like to encourage you to give these people a chance and hear them out. Even so, I'd like to bring to attention that clinic escorts often block the patients from ever having the chance to speak to the sidewalk counselors both physically and verbally, sometimes with loud music and megaphones, and sometimes they even harass and physically engage the sidewalk counselors and picketers. And also I'd like to point out that many pro-choicers and clinic escorts perpetuate a fear of pro-lifers, painting them all as violent, raving, "crazies" and make sure to keep women from hearing them, non-the-less talk to them. She's not given a choice once she's at the clinic and in the grasp of a clinic escort. She's often rushed into the clinic, regardless of whether it's of her own will, past the sidewalk counselors without a second thought. And clinic escorts are often eager for the protestors to get forcibly removed from the premises and often rough-up the sidewalk counselors and fabricate and over-eggagerate minor offenses to local police, who often side with the clinic, as demonstrated below.
http://community.livejournal.com/ljforchoice/92838.html
http://abortionviolence.com/SC.HTM#ACLU1
http://abortionviolence.com/CA.HTM#BACAOR
http://abortionviolence.com/WI.HTM#MCPC
http://abortionviolence.com/MN.HTM#PPFA
http://abortionviolence.com/CO.HTM#PPFA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MwbCMMBnTcQ
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6lj4vRgZ69g
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YOptXN8UXfc

"But when someone goes into an abortion clinic, she already knows what she's going there for."

When women go into these clinics considering having an abortion, often they go there with a heavy heart. Most of the time, we find that they feel ambvient about the decision, that abortion is their only viable option. In addition, one study found that 64% of American women felt pressured by others to have an abortion. In fact, when it comes to counseling provided by the clinic, the same study found more than half felt rushed, yet 67% received no counseling and 79% were not told about available alternatives (1), as demonstrated by the testimonies of past and current clinic workers and women who've had abortions.
http://www.clinicquotes.com/selling.html
http://www.clinicquotes.com/womensconsent.html http://www.passboards.org/forumdisplay.php?f=18
http://www.unfairchoice.info/intro.htm
http://www.abortionconcern.org/abortion-info/forced-or-coerced.php

"Showing her an aborted fetus or telling her how she's going to burn in hell is not going to somehow "convince" her."

I agree. When people start flashing gory images or yelling to them that they are sinners and murderers, and that they need to repent, it does not sway them to choose life. I think it scares them more or worse, angers them and would want to go through with the abortion just to spite them. They go into the "leave me alone, its my life and body thinking" Rather I think they should be dealt with compassion and understanding. These women need someoe to love them and support them and help them.

"Do sidewalk counselors actually change minds?"
It is a difficult ministry, and while it is not always the case, but yes, there have been women who've changed their minds after speaking with a sidewalk counselors.

On a Related Note:
Sidewalk Counseling Guides:
http://thoughts-and-faith-to-share.blogspot.com/2007/06/serious-thoughts-on-sidewalk-counseling.html
http://sidewalkcounseling.com/black.asp
http://www.webcom.com/sidewalk/

Sidewalk Counselors Blogs/Testimonies:
http://sidewalk-talk.blogspot.com/
http://sidewalkcounselorsunited.blogspot.com/
http://fdalessio.blogspot.com/2005/04/sidewalk-counseling-apr-2006.html http://afterabortion.blogspot.com/2005/05/compassionate-sidewalk-counseling-how.html
http://anniebanno.blogspot.com/2005/05/real-truth-about-crisis-pregnancy.html
http://www.dawneden.com/2006/10/across-streetby-guestbloggerdennis.html
http://thedramaofexistence.blogspot.com/2006/09/encounter.html
http://generationsforlife.org/2006/0914/a-life-saved/
http://theschoolofmary.blogspot.com/2007/02/providence-at-planned-parenthood-and.html

Audio/Video:
No Greater Joy (Caution: brief images of aborted fetuses)
This video discusses sidewalk counselinig from the perspective of four individuals: who they are, the type of information they distribute, spiritual involvement, how to approach women ("don't yell at the women and if they yell at you, don't respond", "don't be rude to any woman you're speaking to, never shout", "don't accuse this woman. You're not there to accuse, you're there to help") and guidelines, caring about both woman and child.

More About Sidewalk Counseling

Sources:
1) VM Rue et. al., “Induced abortion and traumatic stress: A preliminary comparison of American and Russian women,” Medical Science Monitor 10(10): SR5-16 (2004).

Sunday, October 22, 2006

Achromic on the Run: I am talking to your kids and so is everyone else

Fellow blogger, Achromic on the Run, wrote about her concern with kids unsupervised on the internet. While the internet can be an educational tool and a source of entertainment for children, dangers also lurk on the internet in the form of child predators and child exploitation.
This is one area where I actually agree with Achromic. In order to keep kids safe, it takes parents being involved/interested in what their chld is doing on the computer/internet, IN ADDITION to electronic filters and monitering programs. I can't emphasize enough that computers and filters can't replace parental invovlment in keeping kids safe on the internet.  Also, the parent/guardians need to be understand why and become interested in keeping their kids safe. In this  And Namaan made a good point in the comments at Achromic's blog, many parents I agree are intimidated by the challenge of trying to supervise internet access or just don't know where to start. You see, this is an issue our library (where I work) has been tackling. Recently our library sponsored a seminar, for parents and children in the community on internet safety based on the NetSmartz website.  The seminar took a multi-pronged approach 1) We had a speaker from the state police, whom gave statistics on missing and endangered children and the NCMEC website (awareness). 2)A detective specializing in child exploitation and internet safety concerns, gave information on the risks and how to be safer on various websites (i.e Myspace, Yahoo, Facebook, etc.) And he emphasized the importance of parents being involved and aware of what thier children are doing on the computer. (education) 3)A technical support specialist gave information on how to check a child's internet activities (via standard Windows features): history folder, internet cookies, and temporary internet files. But he also noted that many teens are quite savvy at computers and may know how to erase their tracks. So he also discussed parental controls, and various filtering and monitering software(which can be password protected), parents may also wish to utilitize. I think there's no one easy answer as to how to go about monitering a child on the computer, but rather we need to take a multi-demential approach.
Here's a couple more websites recommended at our library:
http://safekids.com/child_safety.htm
http://staysafe.org/
http://missingkids.com/
http://cybertipline.com/

Also you can find a list of kid friendly sites at "The Librarian's Guide to Great Websites for Kids"
http://ala.org/greatsites

Saturday, October 21, 2006

Center of Contraversy - Stop My Abortion blog

This blog has in recent months become the center of attention and contraversy. Stop My Abortion is the blog of a rather cynical and crass 20 yrs old woman whom just found herself unexpectedly pregnant. The woman in question, is low income and works as a bartender. In her first post April 18, she said, "Either click on the paypal link on the side of this page and give what you can, or I'm going to get this fetus scraped and sucked out of me in six month's time." The premise behind the blog was that if pro-lifers really do care about and want to save all unwanted babies, then they should pay the money to care for such children and if the pro-lifers didn't come up with the prescribed amount (and showed themselves to be hypocrits), she was going to have a late-term abortion at six month gestation. And as another blogger pointed out, as if any unwillingness to provide financial assistance (read hypocrisy) on pro-lifers' part validates the need for Roe vs. Wade. Now to me, this blog seems to be a satiracle strike at pro-lifers, in addition, there are a few things wrong with it I see.
1) The author is posing the age-old pro-choice rhetorical question: "If you're against abortion, are you going to pay for the care of all all the unwanted children in the world?" S/he is merely trying to point out flaws in the pro-life argument with logical fallacies and stereotyping.
2) If you do donate money, there's no guarantee this story is real or that your hard money will go to a a true charity cause. Instead I'd donate to an established local charity, to be sure the money will be used as you intend, such as the United Way or American Red Cross. I don't think an individual's unwillingness to donate always reflects the state of political beliefs or charitability as much as worthwhile caution in donating to a cause we have no certainty is true.
3) That kind of attention-getting rubs me all the wrong way, whether serious or satire. Experiencing an unplanned pregnancy and making the decision to have an abortion is not a decision to be taken lightly, like going to the beauty salon. The abortion jokes lead me to conclusions about the maturity of (or complete lack there of) the one making such jokes.
4) If this story were true and not satire, there are better ways than online solicitation (which is questionable at best) to going about to getting support and assistance. There are a number of established non-political pro-life organizations which can provide pregnancy and parenting assistance or even just financial assistance and help with basic needs. There are over 4,000 woman helping centers (comprised of pregnancy resource centers, maternity housing, adoption agencies, social services agencies, and participating church parishes) in the U.S. and 36 other countries. On the other hand, when someone genuinely wants help and I am capable of offering such help, I do so. I've helped a number of pregnant, parenting, and post-abortion young women in finding/applying for help when they otherwise had nowhere to turn.
5) Even if she was able to raise the $40,000 from pro-lifers, I don't think that alone would be enough to change her perception of pro-lifers and her political stance. The damned if you do, damned if you don't mentality. If you're a pro-lifer and you donate to this so-called woman's cause, you're accused of spending your money on caring for fetuses and not caring about the needs of born children. If you don't donate, you're accused of being a hypocrit and not caring about the unborn or caring about the women who carry an unwanted pregnancy to term. Basically it's a no-win situation, I wouldn't waste your time in discussion there.
Well, October 19 came and she had not received all of the prescribed amount ($40,000) and so she supposidly had the late-term abortion, posting questionable images of the result of the abortion. The blog has received mixed reactions from both pro-choice and pro-lifers alike. Support from pro-choicers congradulating her on "showing the hypocricy of anti-choicers" and criticism from both sides. Now I don't agree with the slander she's received from pro-life individuals, regardless of the blog being satire, such behavior does not show good will on pro-lifers part.
Update: Jivin' J brings it to our attention that , "Help My Baby Live," a website with a very similar premise to the "Stop my Abortion" blog has appeared.

Tuesday, October 10, 2006

Welcome to the Sunset End of Life Center...How Do You Want to Die?

This is a satire of what may occur if end of life rights advocates got their way and physician-assistated suicide were to become legal, using a parody to Allegancy Reproductive Health Center's "How do you want your abortion?" and Debi Jackson's "The World As I Would Create It" as well as guidelines from an actual existing euthanasia group, "Final Exit Network"

Let's imagine a world where physcian assisted suicide is considered a private matter to be decided by the indvidual and their physician, along with their partner, family, and/or clergy if they so choose.
Welcome to the Sunset End of Life Center. My name is Jane and I'm here to assist and support you through your end of life journey. As you drive towards our center, you will probably noticed the enclosed and gated parking lot. I apologize for any inconvience this may cause. We provide this for you and your family's safety. As you enter the building, the first room you will come across is the waiting room. This is where you will check in with the secretary and a staff member will be right with you. On the first floor, are our patient service offices. First, you will meet with one of our Sunset Guides. Your individual needs and timetable will be evaluated and coordinated with your Sunset Guide who will interview you about your physical and spiritual preferences and provide you with information on all alternatives for care at the end of life, including all legal methods of self-deliverance that will produce a peaceful, quick, certain and painless termination of life. Full emotional support is available to you and those close to you, tailored to your needs.We have an on-staff pyschologist as part of our support staff. And for those who seek spiritual resoluation and comfort, we offer various spiritual services and also have an in-house chapel, which is also located on the first floor. You will also be encouraged to seek consultations with others such as your spiritual advisor, oncologist, and/or other medical specialists. The procedure itself will be preformed in either a shared medical suite or one of our private medical suites on the second floor. We will work with you to tailor your experience to your individual needs and desires. This may include involving your family, items of comfort, a relaxing enviroment, a spiritual ceremony, pain relief options, etc. And each medical suite contains a bed, a comfortable recliner, a couch, and a closet (for your personal belongings) and each medical suite looks out onto either our floral garden or our reflection pond. Your final resting place will be determined according to the prior arangements made by yourself and/or family members, whether you wish to be creamated on site or wish to be sent to a funeral home, place of worship, or private burial site.

Packages:
Economy -- A basic "no frills" package is available for those individuals who don't need ambiance or additional support.  The procedure will be performed by an experienced and kind physician with your choice of pain relievers and sedatives. You will be roomed in a group medical suite with 3 other individuals, each bed partitioned and each individual's privacy respected. Yourself and other patients have chosen not to involve support persons and so the only persons in your medical suite will be be other patients and medical personel.

Spiritual Journey --The end of life journey is not just a physical experience but also a spiritual process. We offer a chaplaincy program and an in-house chapel. You can choose to  meet with one of our chaplains/spirit healers and guide a week in advance to plan the ritual journey that will meet your spiritual needs. Native American (Taino clan tradition), Eastern philosophy, nature-inspired (pagan), or custom designed ceremonies are available to you and to the support people who will accompany you on your spirit quest. Or, design your own rituals with the help of our experienced guides. The procedure will be performed by an experienced and kind physician in privacy with your choice of pain relievers and sedatives.


Full Emotional Support--The decision to end your life may well be the most difficult emotional decisions  an individual, couple, or family may face. Our experienced counselor will spend 2 hours with you and support person of your choice, and your appointment will be scheduled 2-7 days after that. The counselor will explore various issues, religious and spiritual concerns and offer grief coping skills to your loved ones. A choice of 3 self help books are included with additional suggestions for grief work and emotional aftercare for your loved ones. The procedure will be performed by an experienced and kind physician in privacy with your choice of pain relievers and sedatives.

The Family Package--This is an important decision in your life and of course you want your loved ones around you!! You can be accompanied through every phase of this process by the person(s) of your choosing. Counseling is available for all family members and includes training and suggestions for them to participate in your care prior to the procedure.

We thank you for choosing the Sunset End of Life Center and hope we can meet your family's needs now and for generations to come.

Monday, September 11, 2006

We Remember...

We remember and honor the heroes and victims who died at the World Trade Center, the Pentagon, and on Flight 93, September 11th, 2001.

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

I'd like to ask for a moment of silence right now for the victims and heroes who died on this day as well as for their family and friends....

Our thoughts and prayers are with them on this day.

Monday, September 4, 2006

Remebering Steve Irwin [May He Rest In Peace♥]

Steve "The Crocodile Hunter" Irwin was a naturalist, conservationist, father, and husband. He loved to interact with and was passionate and dedicated to the protection of wildlife and educating the public. September 4, 2006, Irwin was fatally pierced in the chest by a short-tail stingray barb while diving in Batt Reef (part of the Great Barrier Reef), off the coast of Port Douglas in Queensland. Irwin was in the area filming his own documentary, to be called The Ocean's Deadliest, but weather had stalled filming. Irwin decided to take the opportunity to film some shallow water shots for a segment in the television program his daughter Bindi was hosting when, according to his friend and colleague John Stainton, he swam too close to one of the animals. He came on top of the stingray and the stingray's barb went up and into his chest and and through  his heart.

Steve led an exciting life having a love for animals like no other this death comes tragic to Steve's family (his wife and 2 children) and also to his fans all across the world.

Steve Irwin: Febuary 22nd, 1962 - September 4th, 2006

A nice slideshow tribute can be found in the videos below:



Sunday, August 13, 2006

Important Note From NAMI Regarding Suicide Hotline

1-800-SUICIDE Hotline Set to Shut Down

Update #1:
August 11, 2006 6:30 PM

As NAMI reported yesterday, the nation's largest suicide hotline, 1-800-SUICIDE, is scheduled to go out of service. But instead of this occurring on Saturday, August 12, as previously announced, the operator of this hotline has been given a two week extension. Negotiations are still in progress that may prevent the number from going out of service. However, NAMI is still urging the public to be aware that the alternative number for those in crisis is 1-800-273-TALK.

This number will put callers in touch with the federally-funded National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, a service that has been in operation since January, 2005. It functions as a central switchboard to immediately connect callers to virtually the same network of certified, local crisis centers accessed by 1-800-SUICIDE. So callers can receive counseling or emergency services, if needed, close to home.

All calls to the 1-800-273-TALK Lifeline are private and confidential. Confidentiality of personal information and of personal disclosures during calls is a high priority for the parties involved in operating the Lifeline.

The federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) is working with the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline and the entire suicide prevention community to ensure that every call for help during a suicide crisis is answered. Some of the measures being put in place include:

Ensuring that the entire suicide-prevention community is working the phones and Internet to make sure that all referring agencies know that 1-800-273-TALK is the number to call for suicide intervention.
Notifying service providers, including directory 411 and 211 operators, that 1-800-SUICIDE is scheduled to go out of service in two weeks, and to direct callers to 1-800-273-TALK for help.
Redirecting callers who call 1-800-SUICIDE to call 1-800-273-TALK through a recording.
NAMI will continue to stay involved with these efforts and will distribute additional information as it becomes available.

NAMI urges you to help distribute this alert in your community. Together, we can ensure that every call for help is answered.

Thank you,

Michael J. Fitzpatrick, MSW
Executive Director
NAMI
Update #2:
September 26, 2006
The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and Kristin Brooks Hope Center (KBHC) reached an agreement on August 25, 2006 which ensured the continued operation of 1-800-SUICIDE.  As of September 25, 2006, SAMHSA is maintaining the line.
SAMHSA has been in contact with KBHC and appreciates their ongoing cooperation and collaboration in ensuring that individuals in suicidal crisis receive the help that they need.
SAMHSA not anticipate any changes in the near future that would affect the status of the line.  If any material changes arise that would affect potential callers, SAMHSA will move swiftly to notify the field.
SAMHSA expresses appreciation for the support of the mental health and suicide prevention fields.  They hope that all parties will continue to move forward and speak with one voice about the importance of suicide prevention at a national level.


Original:
August 10, 2006

The nation's largest suicide hotline, 1-800-SUICIDE, is scheduled to go out of service this Saturday, August 12, 2006. There are currently negotiations in progress that may prevent this. However, in the event that these negotiations are not successful, NAMI is issuing this alert to raise public awareness of the alternative for those in need of help.

The alternative number for those in crisis is 1-800-273-TALK. This number will put callers in touch with the federally-funded National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, a service that has been in operation since January, 2005. It functions as a central switchboard to immediately connect callers to virtually the same network of certified, local crisis centers accessed by 1-800-SUICIDE. So callers can receive counseling or emergency services, if needed, close to home.

All calls to the 1-800-273-TALK Lifeline are private and confidential. Confidentiality of personal information and of personal disclosures during calls is a high priority for the parties involved in operating the Lifeline.

The federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) is working with the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline and the entire suicide prevention community to ensure that every call for help during a suicide crisis is answered. Some of the measures being put in place include:

-- Ensuring that the entire suicide-prevention community is working the phones and Internet to make sure that all referring agencies know that 1-800-273-TALK is the number to call for suicide intervention.
-- Notifying service providers, including directory 411 and 211 operators, that 1-800-SUICIDE is scheduled to go out of service beginning August 12, 2006 and to direct callers to 1-800-273-TALK for help.
-- Redirecting callers who call 1-800-SUICIDE to call 1-800-273-TALK through a recording.

As a part of this effort, NAMI will participate in a meeting with SAMHSA and its other partner groups on Friday afternoon, August 11, and we will issue an update afterwards if there is additional information to share.

NAMI urges you to help distribute this alert in your community. Together, we can ensure that every call for help is answered.

Thank you,

Michael J. Fitzpatrick, MSW
Executive Director
NAMI
 
Bulletins can be read at the NAMI (National Alliance for the Mentally Ill) site
here

Thursday, June 15, 2006

Human Rights Issue: Human Trafficking

Every day, women and children are enslaved - trapped due to fear, coercion and exploitation- and sold into sex-trafficking rings. These women often face a dismal life of poor living conditions and daily rapes, beatings, and almost constant exposure to STDs, unwanted pregnancy, and communicable disease. Faced with threats of beatings or harm to their families, they stay out of fear and often remained enslaved until they can be rescued.

You can learn more about this human rights issue and what can be done here:
http://www.humantrafficking.com/
http://www.humantrafficking.org/
Movie: Human Trafficking

Victim testimonies can be found here:
http://www.humantrafficking.com/humantrafficking/features_ht3/Testimonies/testimonies_mainframe.htm
http://www.mylifetime.com/movies/three-true-tales-human-trafficking-survivors

Wednesday, June 14, 2006

Indiana Amber Alert Ends in Tragedy

This is in regards to the Indiana Amber Alert issued Tuesday morning. The two missing children, Collin Walker, age 4 and Monte Walker, age 2 were found with the accused kidnapper, their father,  Katron Walker, late Tuesday evening in Blackhawk, a rural area near Terre Haute. All three had stab wounds issued by the father and tragically little Collin Walker was found dead at the scene. Reportedly, Katron Walker was under the influence of Methamphetamines and Marijuana at the time of the murder. The surviving son is recovering as is the father and the father may be charged with murder.
Could the child's needless death have been prevented? There's questioning if there was a delay in the Amber Alert response time by police and an investigation led by county and state police may be taking place in two to four weeks.

News Stories:
June 14, 2006:
WRTV6, Indianapolis
Amber Alert Issued For Two Boys
Police: Boys, Father 'Accounted For' After Amber Alert
Police: Man Killed Son, Injured Another After Divorce Threat
Alert Delay? Police Say Threat To Boys Wasn't Immediately Clear (editor's note: considering one child ended up dead, I'd say it was clear)

WISH TV 8, Indianapolis
Police Say Father 'Can't Believe He Killed His Children'
Abduction, boy's death highlight Amber Alert challenges
                        
WXIN-TV (Fox 59), Indianapolis
Father who kidnapped his two children accused of killing one
Witnesses say police slow to search for father accused of murder
Terre Haute Tribune (newspaper)
Co-workers pray for family of slain child
Father may face murder charge in death of son
Boys, dad spent day together before he allegedly killed older son

More on the Amber Alert system can be found at:
http://codeamber.com/

Saturday, June 3, 2006

Do Pro-Lifers Care About the Born?

A popular question addressed to the pro-life individual/advocate is: Do you care about the welfare of born children and adults of this world? What about lessening the numbers of children brought up in poverty or suffering? Patricia Beninato recently challenged us pro-lifers with this on her blog.
Usually this is used as a red herring or an ad hominem attack to divert the issue at hand or to discredit pro-lifers. One might ask themselves how this has bearing on the humanity of the unborn, the personhood debate, or women's rights? But it's still a worthy concern. Actually many (not all) pro-life individuals are both involved in community improvement programs and working on an individual basis to help individuals with their basic needs. For example, the following are the community improvement programs and projects I've been involved in:

Harvest Soup Kitchen (1999-2003) and Christian Ministries Food Pantry (1999-2001)
I have volunteered, of my own free will, 2-4 hours a week a the local soup kitchen and food pantry, in order to fulfill the basic needs of the impoverished.

Mission Trip to Appalachia (June 2000)
Three young adults and two chaperones from St. Mary's Catholic Church went on a mission trip to Clintwood, Viriginia, a small town located in the Appalachian Mountains. Clintwood is a former mining and industrial town with a high poverty rate. There, St. Joseph Catholic Church assists families in need of various kinds of assistance. About 20 groups, from around the mid-west United States, visit each each summer to do volunteer work. Our group consisted of three young adults and two adults chaperones, one whom is a professional construction worker and instructor at a local vocational college. We were there for a week and during that time were granted stay in a small home owned by the church  Previous to our trip, we spent two days learning basic construction skills from a trained professional (who was also one of the adult chaperons). We were assigned to do some home repair on an elderly lady's shack. She had electricity and running water (which is unsafe to drink due to septic contamination) and no indoor bathroom (just a port-a-pot in her front yard). We repaired a large hole in the living room floor and kitchen and tore-down, rebuilt, and painted her front and side porch.  It was an eye-opening experience to see poverty at its worst. We received the reward of seeing the greatfulness from the elderly lady and her grown children.

Campus Christian Fellowship Service Team (fall 2002-January 2005)
A volunteer effort for college students to go out and make a difference in the community. Activities include: assisting in home repairs and yard work at The Children's Home (a privately owned foster home group located in South Eastern Illinois), assisting the local Salvation Army by bell ringing at Christmas, and more.

Heart to Heart Pregnancy Care Center (February 2003-Fall 2005)
I was volunteer receptionist and clothing room volunteer at Heart to Heart Pregnancy Care Center, an affiliate of Care Net International.

Relay For Life, American Cancer Society (June 23 and 24, 2006, June 22 and 23, 2007)
I participated in the local Relay for Life. Relay For Life is an overnight celebration of hope, progress and answers. In honor of the 8.5 million Americans who have survived cancer, teams of friends, families and co-workers raise funds to support the continued fight against the disease.

NAMI Walks for the Mind of America (June 2007 and  2008)
I've participated in this awareness/fundraising walkathon for mental illness. NAMI is the National Alliance on Mental Illness. The common message of NAMI is support, education, advocacy, and research.

Employer: Residential Facility for Individuals with Developmental and Behavioral Challenges (October 2007-November 2009 and May 2011 - Present)
I prior worked 40+ hours/week  as direct care staff (actual title: Direct Service Technician) with children and young adults with severe autism and other developmental disabilities.

My best and closest friend is a single mom to a school-aged child. I was there for her through her pregnancy and was there when her daughter was born. We continue get together on a regular basis, also I've been there to provide emotional support, provide transportation to doctor's offices and Medicaid appointments, provided childcare for her daughter, but most of all continue to giver her support and encouragement.

Furthermore, I have an entry on child abuse awareness and prevention and I keep a public list of hotline numbers, mental health resources, and resources for those facing a poor prenatal diagnosis, as well as make use of local United Way community directories and internet search engines to help individuals find community services on request.

Pregnancy resource centers generally provide practical needs items for mothers and children up to age 3 regardless of race, sex, or religion. Here is one such clothing room of a pregnancy resource center in Indiana. The items may include: maternity clothes, children's clothings (premie up to 24T), children's hygiene items, baby food and formula, packs of diapers (on an emergency basis), and baby/children's furniture. Most PRCs have a limited supply of furniture, clothing, and other material items. All items have been generously donated or purchased with funds donated by individuals, local churches, and community organizations. The types and amount of supplies they have available varies from week to week and month to month. Some of it is new, some used. It is only the intentional of the PRC (volunteers and staff as a whole) to be of help in the early days of one's parenthood and assist the mother until she is able to support herself and for a number of practical reasons should not be expected to support her until her children are grown.

We usually don't go around anouncing or advertising our involvement and contributions. And why should we? We should be accountible of our good deeds only to ourselves and our higher power. And one should do acts of kindness from the heart and in humbility, not to make a political point nor looking for public praise or rewards. It's with hesistation I share my accomplishments, but I wanted to make a point. I am one of many pro-lifers who make positive contributions in our community, but often without recognition or reward. I realize that you may not trust that myself or any other pro-lifer is telling the truth, but that issue lies with you.

Original Comments Made for this Entry...

CatS. wrote:
well said!

Monday, May 22, 2006

Crisis Hotlines and Resources

Disclaimer: This directory is for informational purposes only. No representation is made or warranty given to each organization listed herein concerning the accuracy or completeness of any information contained, or services provided, herein. Persons accessing this information assume full responsibility for the use of services and information herein and understand that I am not responsible or liable for any claim arising from the use of these services. Also, the self-help books and websites listed here are not intended to substitute a professional's assesment or treatment.

Find Services Near You by Your local Community Information Directory: Most communities have a community information directory operated by the local United Way or a similiar organization, with a 211 or similiar number. These directories keep a usually pretty up-to-date listing of a wide range of community-based programs.

Find Services Near You By Search Engine
Instructions: Click on the following link. Type in a keyword or business name related to the type of service you are interested in, fill in your location and click "Find It!"
http://www.superpages.com/

Instructions: Click on the following link. Click on "Change Location" link in the upper right hand corner to fill in your location. Now enter your city and state/providence and country (if you live outside the U.S.) and click, "Continue". Now you'll be taken back to the main Yahoo! Yellow Pages web page. In the Search box, simply type in a keyword or business name related to the type of service you are interested in and click, "Search".
http://yp.yahoo.com/

Table of Contents:
Alcohol, Nicotine, and Substance Abuse Addiction Recovery
Domestic Violence/Abuse, Sexual Assault, and Trauma Recovery Hotlines
Bereavement
Disabilities
Food and Shelter Assistance
Clothing and Home Goods Assistance
Education/Vocational
Family
Financial Assistance
Health Care Assistance
Mental Health
Runaway Children/Teens Helplines
Safe Infant Abandonment
STI (Sexually Transmitted Infection)/HIV Information, Testing, and Treatment
 
Alcohol, Nicotine, and Substance Abuse Addiction Recovery

Hotlines:
Canada:
Kids Help Line
Toll-free: 1-800-668-6868
http://kidshelp.sympatico.ca/

United Kingdom:
RE-SOLV
Society for Prevention of Solvent & Volatile Substance Abuse
30A High Street Stone
Staffordshire ST15 8AW
England
Phone: 01785 817 885
Freephone Help Line: 0808 800 2345
http://www.re-solv.org/

AL-Anon
For families and friends of problem drinkers
Phone: 020 7403 0888 (confidential helpline, open 7 days a week 10am-10pm)

Alcoholics Anonymous
Phone: 08457 697 555

Careline
Counselling for children, young people and adults
Phone: 020 8514 1177

CHILDLINE UK
Freephone: 0800 11 11
http://www.childline.org.uk/
Free, 24-hour, national helpline for children and youth in trouble or danger throughout the UK.

Drinkline
Offers advice and support to anyone concerned about their own or someone else’s drinking
Freephone 0800 917 8282

Get Connected
Referral service, will find young people the best place that can help whatever the problem
Phone: 0808 808 4994

Heroine Helpline (UK)
Phone: 020 7749 4053

Kid Help
Children and adolescents in crisis will receive immediate help. Referrals to shelters, mental health services, sexual abuse treatment, substance abuse, family counseling, residential care, adoption/foster care, etc.
1-800-543-7283

National Drugs Helpline
For drug users, their families, friends and carers call free on 0800 776600

Release
Drugs and legal advice for users, families and friends
Tel: 020 7729 9904

United States:
Al-Anon/Alateen Hotline
Hope & Help for young people who are the relatives & friends of a problem drinker.
1-800-344-2666
http://www.al-anon.alateen.org/

Alcohol & Drug Referral Hotline (United States)
1(800) 252-6465

Alcohol Abuse & Crisis Intervention Line
1-800-234-0246

Cocaine Anonymous
(800) 347-8998

CSAT's National Drug and Alcohol Treatment Routing Service
Provides referrals to local facilities where adolescents and adults can seek help. Brief intervention.
1(800) 662-4357

Ecstasy Addiction
1-800-468-6933

National Drug Information, Treatment & Referral Line
Provides referrals to local facilities where adolescents and adults can seek help.
1-800-821-4357
(1-800-662-HELP)

Marijuana Anonymous
(800) 766-6779

National Cocaine Hotline
1(800) 262-2463

Recovery Hotline Referral Service
1(800) 888-9383

Substance Abuse Treatment Facilities Locator (U.S)
http://dasis3.samhsa.gov/

Informational/Prevention Organizations and Websites:
Australia/New Zealand:
New Zealand Drug Foundation
PO Box 3082
Wellington
New Zealand
Phone: (04) 499 2920
http://www.nzdf.org.nz/

Network of Alcohol/Drug Agencies
PO Box 2345
Strawberry Hills NSW 2012
Australia
Phone: (02) 92814781
http://www.nada.org.au/

Canada:
Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse
75 Albert Street, Suite 300
Ottawa, ON K1P 5E7
Canada
Phone: (613) 235-4048
http://www.ccsa.ca/

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Assistance and Training (Canada)
c/o Homewood Health Care Centre
49 Emma Street, Suite 100
Guelph Ontario, N1E 6X1
Canada
Phone: (519) 822-2476
http://home.golden.net/~fasat

United Kingdom:
EUROCARE
Secretariat
1 The Quay
St. Ives
Cambridgeshire PE17 4AR
United Kingdom
Phone: 0148 046 6766
http://www.eurocare.org/
Advocacy for the prevention of alcohol-related harm in Europe.

Management of Substance Abuse
World Health Organization
Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse
Management of Substance Abuse Team
20 Avenue Appia
1211 Geneva 27 Switzerland
Phone: 022 791 4325
www.who.int/substance_abuse/

National Addiction Centre
London Institute of Psychiatry
4 Windsor Walk
Camberwell, London, SE5 8AF England
Phone: 0171 703 5411
http://web1.iop.kcl.ac.uk/IoP/Departments/PsychMed/NAC/index.shtml

United States
American Council on Alcoholism
1(800) 527-5344

Just Say No International
1(800) 258-2766

National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information
1(800) 729-6686

National Council on Alcoholism
1(800) 622-2255

National Parents' Resource Institute for Drug Education
1(800) 667-7433

Nicotine Addiction And Cigarettes - From the Americal Lung Association American Lung Association info sheets on smoking, nicotine, and related topics.
www.lungusa.org/

Nicotine Junkies
Information on kids and smoking, facts about smoking and addiction
http://whyfiles.org/024nicotine/

North American Syringe Exchange Network(NASEN)
535 Dock St., Ste. 112
Tacoma, WA 98402
253-272-4857

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA)
http://www.samhsa.gov/


Domestic Violence/Abuse, Sexual Assault, and Trauma Recovery Hotlines
World-Wide List of Domestic Abuse Agencies
http://www.hotpeachpages.net/ 
Global inventory of hotlines, shelters, refuges, crisis centres and women's organizations, searchable by country, plus index of domestic violence resources in over 70 languages. Please refer to this website for international resources.

American Women Overseas
3300 N.W. 185th Street, Suite 133
Portland, OR 97229
Toll-free: 1-866-USWOMEN (International Crisis Line) (1-866-879-6636)
Phone: (503) 907-6554
Fax: (503) 907-6554
E-mail: awos@awoscentral.com
URL: http://www.awoscentral.com/  
Organization dedicated to assisting American women living overseas victimized by domestic violence. Outreach, safety planning, extensive support services, general info on domestic violence at website.

IACP Model Policy on Police Officer Involved Domestic Violence
Toll-free: 1-800-THE IACP
E-mail: information@theiacp.org  
http://www.theiacp.org/documents/index.cfm?fuseaction=document&document_type_id=1&document_id=175
The International Association of Chiefs of Police Policy addresses prevention, intervention, and prosecution approaches. Documents available for free download as WORD files.

U.S. Department of Defense Policy on Domestic Violence in the Military
The Department of Defense addresses prevention, intervention, and prosecution approaches, as well as provides advocacy for victims.
http://www.militaryhomefront.dod.mil/

National Domestic Violence Hotline
1-800-799-SAFE (1-800-799-7233)
http://www.ndvh.org/
National Domestic Violence Hotline TDD (for the hearing-impaired)
1-800-787-3224

Rape, Abuse, and Incest National Network (RAINN)
RAINN is a 24-hour national hotline for victims of sexual assault. Calls to the hotline are instantly computer-routed to the 24-hour rape crisis center nearest the caller.
Toll-free 24-hour Hotline: 1-800-656-HOPE
http://www.rainn.org/
The AWARE Foundation: Hotlines
http://awarefoundation.org/resources/sexual_abuse_hotlines.aspx

Battered Women's Justice Project
http://www.bwjp.org/

New Social Security Numbers For Domestic Violence Victims
Protecting your identity if you are a victim of domestic violence
http://www.ssa.gov/pubs/10093.html

Childhelp USA National Child Abuse Hotline
National Hotline: 1-800-4-A-CHILD (1-800-422-4453)
TDD: 1-800-2-A-CHILD

Kid Help
Children and adolescents in crisis will receive immediate help. Referrals to shelters, mental health services, sexual abuse treatment, substance abuse, family counseling, residential care, adoption/foster care, etc.
1-800-543-7283
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children
National Hotline: 1-800-THE-LOST
www.ncmec.org/

Voices In Action
1-800-7-VOICE-8 (1-800-786-4238) (Hours: 9am - 6pm CT)
Listings for treatment & support for victims of incest & child sexual abuse.

Gay & Transgender Hate Crime Hotline
1-800-616-HATE

National Center for Victims of Crime
1-800-FYI-CALL (8:30 a.m. - 8:30 p.m. EST)
TTY: 1-800-211-7996,
E-mail: gethelp@ncvc.org
http://www.ncvc.org/

Reconstructive Surgery/Domestic Abuse Hotline
1-800-842-4546
Joint program: National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, providing free reconstructive surgery for victims of domestic violence, male and female.

Informational/Prevention Organizations and Websites:
Canada:
Canadian National Clearinghouse on Family Violence
The NCFV is a national resource centre for all Canadians seeking information about violence within the family, including spouse/partner abuse, child abuse, and elder abuse.
Health Promotion and Programs Branch
Health Canada
Jeanne Mance Building
1907D1, Tunney's Pasture
Ottawa, ON K1A 1B4
Phone: (613) 957-2938
Toll-free: 1-800-267-1291
TTY Toll-free: 1-800-561-5643
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hppb/familyviolence/

Face It! Dating Violence is Not Love!
Information from the RCMP and The National Clearinghouse on Family Violence.
Available in English and French.
www.cyberus.ca/~faceit/

United Kingdom:
Hidden Hurt
Abuse Information and Support Site. Written by a survivor of domestic violence for those in abusive relationships
http://www.hiddenhurt.co.uk/

Rights of Women
Telephone legal advice service for women, offering advice and information on sexual violence and harassment and employment rights, relationship breakdown and arrangements for any children, lesbian parenting, domestic violence. Can provide referrals to sympathetic women solicitors.
52-54 Featherstone Street
London EC1Y 8RT.
Tel: 020 7251 6577
E-mail: info@row.org.uk
http://www.rightsofwomen.org.uk/

Help for Adult Victims of Child Abuse
A non-profit making organisation based in the UK dedicated to provide help, support and information to any adult who is suffering from past childhood abuse.
http://www.pandys.org/

United States:
The Broken Spirits Network
An online support group for victims of abuse & domestic violence
http://www.brokenspirits.com/

Coalition for Children
Comprehensive resource for child abuse, lifeskills education, advocacy, media support, legal & expert witness services, research, strangers, safety on the Internet and bullies.
www.safechild.org/

Center for the Prevention of School Violence
1-800-299-6504

Center for the Prevention of Sexual and Domestic Violence
http://www.cpsdv.org/

Child Abuse Prevention Network
http://www.child-abuse.com/

Family Violence Prevention Fund
http://endabuse.org/

Healing Woman Foundation
1-800-477-4111
http://www.members.tripod.com/~IncestAware/frames.html

Incest Awareness Foundation
1-888 -547-3222

National Resource Center on Domestic Violence
1-800-537-2238
http://www.nrcdv.org/

Pandora's Aquarium
A message board & online support group for survivors of sexual violence
http://www.welcometobarbados.org/pandoras.html

Restraining Order: Protecting Yourself from an Abuser
Information about restraining orders and how to place one in the U.S.
http://incestabuse.about.com/cs/restrainingorders/

Parents Anonymous
Self help groups for abused children and parents under stress
www.parentsanonymous.org/

Symptoms of Emotional Abuse
http://www.lilaclane.com/relationships/emotional-abuse/

Stop It Now! (Sexual Abuse)
1-888-PREVENT
Verbal Abuse
http://www.verbalabuse.com/

WAVE (Working Against Violence Everywhere)
1-888-960-9600
http://www.waveamerica.com/

Bereavement

Hotlines:
United Kingdom
Cruse
Helpline for bereaved people and those caring for bereaved people
Phone: 020 8332 7227

Child death helpline
Telephone helpline for anyone affected by the death of a child
Phone: 0808 282986

Compassionate Friends
Grief support for bereaved parents, families and friends.
Phone: 0117 953 9639

Get Connected
Referral service, will find young people the best place that can help whatever the problem
Phone: 0808 808 4994

Informational/Prevention Organizations and Websites:


Disabilities

Hotlines:
United Kingdom:
Dial UK
Disability information and advice line
Phone: 01302 310 123

Disabled Living Foundation Helpline
Advice on equipment
Phone: 0845 130 9177

RADAR
Royal association for disability and rehabilitation
For non medical issues call
Phone: 020 7250 3222

Get Connected
Referral service, will find young people the best place that can help whatever the problem
Phone: 0808 808 4994

Informational/Prevention Organizations and Websites:
United States:
Disability Info
Your connection to Federal disability-related information & resources
http://disabilityinfo.gov/

Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services
"The Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) oversees formula and discretionary grant programs that help individuals with physical or mental disabilities to obtain employment and live more independently through the provision of such supports as counseling, medical and psychological services, job training and other individualized services."
http://www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/osers/rsa/index.html  

Pregnancy Discrimination Act
For historical purposes, this is the original text of the law, without any subsequent amendments. A Link to the amended Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 is provided
http://www.eeoc.gov/abouteeoc/35th/thelaw/pregnancy_discrimination-1978.html

Hire the Deaf Network
"This is the number one website for individuals who are hearing impaired to find jobs."
http://www.hiredeaf.com/  

Wemedia
"This site focuses on workplace and lifestyle issues facing the disabled."
http://www.wemedia.com/

March of Dimes
Information on birth defects, prenatal care, and a whole range of topics pertaining to staying healthy during pregnancy.
http://www.marchofdimes.com/


Food and Shelter Assistance

Hotlines:
Action Against Hunger International
http://www.actionagainsthunger.org/programs/country_directory.html

St. Vincent DePaul Society International
Promotes a worldview based on the life and teaching of St. Vincent de Paul, in assisting the needy with food, toiletries and clothing.
http://www.vincent.org/index.htm?svdp.htm  

The Salvation Army
"Its mission is to preach the gospel of Jesus Christ and to meet human needs in His name without discrimination"
http://www1.salvationarmy.org/

Habitat for Humanity International
http://www.habitat.org/

Canada
Directory of Food Banks in Canada
http://www.google.com/Top/Society/Philanthropy/Organizations/Hunger_Relief/Food_Banks/Canada/

Directory of Soup Kitchens, Food Banks/Pantries, and Shelters
http://4homeless.hypermart.net/shelters.html

United Kindom:
CHILDLINE UK
Freephone: 0800 11 11
http://www.childline.org.uk/
Free, 24-hour, national helpline for children and youth in trouble or danger throughout the UK.

Get Connected
Referral service, will find young people the best place that can help whatever the problem
Phone: 0808 808 4994

United States:
Links to U.S. State and Local Departments of Public Health (provides referrals in your community)
http://www.apha.org/public_health/state.htm

Directory of Soup Kitchens, Food Banks/Pantries, and Shelters
http://4homeless.hypermart.net/shelters.html

Directory of Food Banks in the U.S.
http://www.google.com/Top/Society/Philanthropy/Organizations/Hunger_Relief/Food_Banks/United_States/

America's Second Harvest Food Banks
U.S. hunger-relief organization that distributes food to millions of hungry Americans through a network of food banks and food-rescue organizations.
http://www.secondharvest.org/site_content.asp?s=4

Goodwill Industries International, Inc.: Find a Goodwill Near You
"Goodwill Industries' operates more than 1,900 retail stores (in the United States) to fund career training and employment programs that help people overcome barriers to employment and become independent, tax-paying members of their communities."
http://locator.goodwill.org/

Women, Infants, and Children
The WIC program helps safeguard the health of low-income women, infants, and children up to age five who are at nutritional risks by providing nutritious foods to supplement diets, information on healthy eating, and referrals to healthcare.
http://www.fns.usda.gov/wic/

USDA Food and Nutrition Service
The federal, state and local governments provide many programs designed to help meet nutritional needs of low-income people and their families.
http://www.fns.usda.gov/fns/menu/PROGRAMS.htm

School Meals
The School Meals Program provides nutrition education and nutritious meals, such as breakfast, lunch, and after-school snacks, to children in order to promote learning readiness and healthy eating habits.
http://www.fns.usda.gov/cnd/

Child and Adult Care Food Program
The Child and Adult Care Food Program provides nutritious meals to low-income children and adults who receive daycare outside of their home.
http://www.fns.usda.gov/cnd/Care/CACFP/cacfphome.htm

HUD Housing Counseling Program
Catholic Charities USA directs the multi-agency Housing Counseling Program, which is funded by a grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Through the program, housing counselors in more than 40 Catholic Charities agencies are trained to provide homebuyer education, mortgage delinquency and reverse mortgage counseling, relocation counseling, and other services.
http://www.catholiccharitiesusa.org/initiatives/housing/index.cfm

If You Are Homeless or May Become Homeless
http://www.nationalhomeless.org/needhelp.html

Homeless Assistance in the United States
http://www.hud.gov/homeless/hmlsagen.cfm

National Listing of Homeless Shelters
http://www.gtii.com/members/lannin/shelters/us.htm

Listing of Homeless Shelters
http://www.google.com/Top/Society/Philanthropy/Organizations/Homeless/

Informational/Prevention Organizations and Websites:
International:
Rehydration Project
http://www.rehydrate.org/

Save The Children
http://www.savethechildren.org/

Christian Children's Fund
http://www.christianchildrensfund.org/

CARE International
http://www.care.org/

World Vision International
http://www.wvi.org/

United States:
Gov. Benefits
The official benefits Web site of the U.S. Government
http://www.govbenefits.gov/govbenefits_en.portal

Housing/Section 8
www.hud.gov/offices/pih/programs/hcv/index.cfm

Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP)
http://www.acf.dhhs.gov/programs/liheap/index.html


Clothing and Home Goods Assistance

Hotlines:
Goodwill Industries International, Inc.: Find a Goodwill near you
"Goodwill Industries' operates more than 1,900 retail stores to fund career training and employment programs that help people overcome barriers to employment and become independent, tax-paying members of their communities."
http://locator.goodwill.org/

The Salvation Army International
"Its mission is to preach the gospel of Jesus Christ and to meet human needs in His name without discrimination"
http://www1.salvationarmy.org/

St. Vincent DePaul Society International
Promotes a worldview based on the life and teaching of St. Vincent de Paul, in assisting the needy with food, toiletries and clothing.
http://www.vincent.org/index.htm?svdp.htm

Dress for Sucess
Career Gear
Dress for Sucess, with affiliates in Australia, Canada, Ireland, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, UK, US.) Charitable organization that offers free interview clothing and other support services to low-income women entering or returning to the workforce. Career Gear, with affiliates in several US cities, offers similar services for low-income men.
http://www.dressforsuccess.org/
http://www.careergear.org/

Share Your Soles
This nonprofit gathers and distributes free, clean secondhand shoes for impoverished people in the US, especially on Native American reservations, and in poorer nations around the globe.
http://www.shareyoursoles.org/

Inexpensive Maternity Clothes
A short how-to-find guide from LovetoKnowPregnancy
http://pregnancy.lovetoknow.com/wiki/Cheap_Maternity_Clothes

Freecycle
This is an international organization that lets you place wanted adds in your community for free things, or to view offer adds from people giving away things. Everything must be free and often times you get what you ask for or it is already being offered for free, you can get anything from furniture to clothing and toys. When you go to the link choose the area you live in and become a member (free) each community has their own personnal site linked to the main page
http://www.freecycle.org/

Pregnancy Resource Centers
Organizations listed under this heading provide counseling and/or information on abortion alternatives and pregnancy/parenting assistance. The objective of the following organizations is not a political one, but a most practical one: to ensure that every woman knows that the resources she needs in order to continue her unplanned pregnancy are available.
Services Include: free pregnancy and infant/toddler supplies (toys, clothing, seasonal clothing, bottles and formula, infant/child hygiene items, diapers, crib blankets and sheets, toys, etc.) community referrals(addiction recovery, child care, clothing/food/furniture/rent/utility assistance, disability services, employment assistance, legal assistance, medical care, mental health counseling, parenting classes, pregnancy support, protective services for victims of abuse, and transportation), and post abortion programs. Also some are liscened medical clinics which provide ultrasound and limited prenatal care.

International Pregnancy Resource Centers & Maternity Homes
Australia, Canada (providence-by-providence), England, India, Ireland, Israel, Japan, New Zealand, South Africa, United States (national and state-by-state)
http://zjam.com/weblinks/Crisis%20Pregnancy%20Centers.html

International Pregnancy Resource for Jerusalem
http://yadletinok.tripod.com/

Birthright International
Birthright provides non-religion-based caring, and unjudgmental support to girls and women who are distressed by an unplanned pregnancy. Using its own resources and those of the community, Birthright offers positive and loving alternatives. They provide friendship and emotional support, free pregnancy testing, and maternity and baby clothes. They also give information and referrals to help clients meet legal, medical, financial, and housing needs. All Birthright services are free, absolutely confidential, and available to any woman regardless of age, race, creed, economic or marital status. 900 centers in the USA/Canada. Some in South Africa and Colombia.
Phone: 1-800-550-4900 (24hrs/7 days a week)
Locate a Center Near You: http://birthright.org/htmpages/locate.htm
Home Page: http://www.birthright.org/
1-800-550-4900

CareNet International/Pregnancy Centers/OptionLine
A non-profit organization supporting a network of over 600 Christian-based pregnancy centers across the United States and Canada. These centers offer free pregnancy tests, peer-counseling, post abortion support and other practical help to women and men facing pregnancy-related concerns.
Phone: 1-800-395-HELP (1-800-395-4357) 24hrs/7 days a week
E-mail: answers@optionline.org
Web Addresses: http://optionline.org or http://www.care-net.org/

Heartbeat International
A non-profit organization supporting a network of over 600 Christian-based pregnancy centers across the United States and Canada. These centers offer free pregnancy tests, peer-counseling, post abortion support and other practical help to women and men facing pregnancy-related concerns.
Phone: 1-800-395-HELP
Other non-critical services, 1-888-550-7577
E-Mail: support@heartbeatinternational.org
Web Address: http://heartbeatinternational.org/worldwide_directory.asp

United States:
Catholic Charities
Social services for anyone (you don’t need to be Catholic) include: adoption, family support, help for at-risk children, housing assistance, job training, respite care, home care, parenting education, pregnancy counseling, prison ministry, refugee and immigration assistance, and treatment for drug and alcohol abuse.
Phone: 1-800-CARE-002, 24-hour national service

The National Life Center
Phone: 1-800-848-LOVE (5683), staffed 24/7
E-mail: mailto:nlc1stway@snip.net
Web Address: http://www.nationallifecenter.com/hotline.htm

The Nurturing Network
"The objective of the Nurturing Network is not a political one, but a most practical one: to ensure that every woman knows that the resources she needs in order to continue her pregnancy are available by calling the Network's toll free number: 1-800-TNN-4MOM. Volunteer members form an extensive employment, medical, educational, counseling and residential network which enables a mother to continue the life of her unborn child without sacrificing her own hopes and dreams. Services include medical assistance, financial assistance, nurturing homes, educational programs, employment & adoption counseling, preparation for parenthood. Staffed during normal business hours, specializing in help for college and professional women; 32,000 volunteer members (nurses, doctors, social workers).
Phone: 1-800-866-4666
Address: PO Box 1498, White Salmon, WA 98672
E-mail: tnn@nurturingnetwork.org
Web Address: http://nurturingnetwork.org/

Diaper Banks
In the US, government benefit programs for low income individuals, such as WIC and food stamps, do not cover the ever-rising, expensive cost of diapers. However, diaper banks have been established to address this problem at the local level.
Southern Arizona; The Valley of the Sun, Arizona
Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties, California
Hartford, Connecticut; New Haven, Connecticut
Southwest Florida
South Boston, Massachusetts
Rhode Island
South King County (Seattle), Washington
Autism Support Group of Genessee County, Michigan helps families with older autistic children still in diapers to get them for free

Education/Vocational

Informational/Prevention Organizations and Websites:
United States
Gov. Benefits
The official benefits Web site of the U.S. Government
http://www.govbenefits.gov/govbenefits_en.portal

Head Start Program (U.S.)
http://www2.acf.dhhs.gov/programs/hsb/

Job Opportunities for Low-income Individuals (JOLI) Program
http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ocs/dcdp/joli/welcome.htm

Financial Aid: Educational Grants for Low-Income Students
http://studentaid.ed.gov/students/publications/student_guide/index.html

Black Collegian
Many of the links lead to discussions of barriers to employment
http://www.blackcollegian.com/

Black Voices
"This site includes job search and many other helpful features for African Americans. This site also includes information about the best companies for African Americans."
http://www.blackvoices.com/

Hire the Deaf Network
"This is the number one website for individuals who are hearing impaired to find jobs."
http://www.hiredeaf.com/

Wemedia
"This site focuses on workplace and lifestyle issues facing the disabled."
http://www.wemedia.com/

Hispanic Business
"This site offers up-to-date stories, links to business related articles, and information about the top 500 Hispanic-owned companies in the United States."
http://www.hispanicbusiness.com/

Monstertrak
"This site has great career information for sutdents and many colleges post their job listings here. Be sure to look for the Career Guide when checking out this site."
http://www.monstertrak.com/


Family

Informational/Prevention Organizations and Websites:
United Kingdom
Careline
Counselling for children, young people and adults
Phone: 020 8514 1177

Parentline
Helpline for the parents and carers of children
Phone: 0808 800 2222

Gingerbread
Advice line for loan (foster) parents
Freephone: 0800 018 4318

National Council for One-parent families
Freephone: 0800 018 5026

United States:
Child Care Assistance for Needy Families
http://www.acf.dhhs.gov/programs/ccb/

Facts About Pregnancy Discrimination
The Pregnancy Discrimination Act in brief
http://www.eeoc.gov/facts/fs-preg.html

Women's Rights Fact Sheet: Your Rights During Pregnancy and Childbirth
http://www.afscme.org/wrkplace/wrfaq06.htm

Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA)
Your rights as an employee during pregnancy
http://www.dol.gov/esa/whd/fmla/
http://www.opm.gov/oca/leave/HTML/fmlafac2.asp

Federal Office of Child Support Enforcement
http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cse/


Financial Assistance

Hotlines:
United Kingdom:
National Debtline
Help for anyone in debt or concerned they may fall into debt
Freephone: 0808 808 4000

Gamcare
Confidential counselling, advice and information for anyone affected by a gambling problem
Phone: 0845 6000 1333

Consumer Credit Counselling Service
Free counselling and advice for people with debt problems
Freephone: 0800 131 1111

United States:
Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF)
http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ofa/


Gov. Benefits
The official benefits Web site of the U.S. Government
http://www.govbenefits.gov/govbenefits_en.portal

Informational/Preventional Organizations and Websites:

Administration for Children and Families: Family Assistance
"The Administration on Children, Youth and Families (ACYF) administers the major Federal programs that support: social services that promote the positive growth and development of children and youth and their families; protective services and shelter for children and youth in at-risk situations; child care for working families and families on public assistance; and adoption for children with special needs."
http://www.acf.dhhs.gov/programs/acyf/
http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ofa/

Unemployment Insurance Information
http://ows.doleta.gov/


Health Care Assistance

Hotlines:
United Kingdom:
Get Connected
Referral service, will find young people the best place that can help whatever the problem
Phone: 0808 808 4994

Health Information Service
Provides information on NHS services and coping with illnesses and treatments. Also provides information about support groups and helplines including smoking, mental health, sexual health and those providing information relating to pregnancy/abortion
FREEphone: 0800 66 55 44

United States
Your local community information directory: Most communities have a community information directory operated by the local United Way or a similiar organization, with a 211 or similiar number. These directories keep a usually pretty up-to-date listing of a wide range of community-based programs.

In many cities, hospitals/health systems also operate non-profit, federally qualified community health centers, which take Medicaid, Medicare, and private insurance, as well as offer a sliding fee scale for those without insurance.

Also, many hospitals/health care systems offer a patient assistance program or managed care program for the uninsured in which the cost of services are discounted on a sliding-fee scale based on their income and household size (you do not have to be on Medicaid to qualify), and not only applies to inpatient services, but also applies to community services affiliated with the hospital or health care system, including primary care and family planning centers, pharmacies, mental health counseling, etc.

Also, there may be other federally-funded, community-based health clinics in the area. At the below link, you can find the websites of U.S. State and Local Departments of Public Health
Your local department of health can provide referrals for financial assistance for medical care and referrals for low-cost or free medical care in your community
http://www.apha.org/public_health/state.htm

Low-Cost Health Care Providers
HRSA Bureau of Primary Health Care-supported Health Centers provide health care to low-income and other vulnerable populations. Health Centers care for people regardless of their ability to pay and whether or not they have health insurance. They provide primary and preventive health care, as well as services such as transportation and translation. Many Health Centers also offer dental, mental health and substance abuse care. Use the search engine at the link below to find one of these health centers in your community
http://ask.hrsa.gov/pc/

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services- Health Resources and Services Administration
Find government-based health assistance programs and reduced-cost healthcare for a range of needs.
http://www.hrsa.gov/help/default.htm

RxAssist - Patient Assistance Programs
The Web's most current and comprehensive directory of Patient Assistance Programs, which are run by pharmaceutical companies to provide free medications to people who cannot afford to buy their medicine. Requires you to register (free).
http://www.rxassist.org/

Needy Meds
Lists pharmaceutical manufacturers' financial assistance programs for patients. Does not require any sort of registration and site is like the Yellow Pages.
http://www.needymeds.com/

Medicaid
www.cms.gov/medicaid/

Insurance for Children
http://www.insurekidsnow.gov/

National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program
For low-income women provides free or low-cost mammograms and Pap tests. Find a free or low-cost mammogram and Pap test in your State.
http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/cancercontacts/nbccedp/contacts.asp

Catholic Charities: Children's Health MattersTM
In partnership with six Catholic health care institutions, Catholic Charities USA sponsors an advocacy and enrollment project that helps uninsured children receive the medical care they need. Catholic Charities USA supports local agencies in enrolling eligible children and advocating for simplified enrollment procedures and increased access to the State Children's Health Insurance Programs.
http://www.childrenshealthmatters.org/

Catholic Charities: Medicare Information and Resources
The Medicare program is rolling out expanded coverage with the addition of the prescription drug program for which Medicare beneficiaries will be eligible to apply for beginning November 15, 2005 and that will go into effect January 1, 2006. Special attention is being made to giving low income Medicare and Medicaid recipients ample time and resources to consider the extra help that is available to them. Starting in May of this year, the Social Security Administration began sending special letters to low income persons who qualify for up to 100% coverage of the cost of their medicine. Many other low income individuals may also qualify for partial assistance towards the cost of their medications. Catholic Charities agencies can serve as an important resource for individuals who may qualify for partial assistance but will need to formally apply to receive the benefit.
http://www.catholiccharitiesusa.org/initiatives/medicare/index.cfm

National Association of Hospital Hospitality Houses
Serves facilities that provide lodging to patients and families during medical emergencies. Features list of homes located in the US.
http://www.nahhh.org/lodging.php
http://www.nahhh.org/medical_resources.php

Ronald McDonald House Charities
Focused on helping families in need by providing affordable housing while children are hospitalized. Provides a list of all homes in the US and Internationally.
Address: One Kroc Drive
Oak Brook, IL 60523
Phone: 630-623-7048
Fax: 630-623-7488
http://www.rmhc.org/rmhc/index/search_house.html

Informational/Preventional Organizations and Websites:
Australia
Public Health Association of Australia
http://www.phaa.net.au/

United Kingdom
Department of Health
http://www.doh.gov.uk/

NHS DIRECT
For immediate and confidential health advice and information 24 hours a day, seven days a week
Phone: 0845 46 47

United States
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
http://www.cdc.gov/

Food and Drug Administration: Recalls and Safety Alerts
http://www.fda.gov/opacom/7alerts.html

Center for Food Safety and Nutrition Consumer Advice
http://vm.cfsan.fda.gov/~lrd/advice.html

National Institutes of Health: Consumer Health Information
http://www.nih.gov/health/consumer/

NCI's CancerNet's Cancer Information
http://cancer.gov/cancerinformation

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG)
http://www.acog.org/

March of Dimes
Information on birth defects, prenatal care, and a whole range of topics pertaining to staying healthy during pregnancy.
http://www.marchofdimes.com/

Mayo Clinic: Pregnancy Center
Tons of information on pregnancy from pre-conception through labor and birth
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/pregnancy/PR99999

World Wide Age of Sexual Consent (regarding statutory rape)
http://www.avert.org/aofconsent.htm

Ectopic Pregnancy
www.ectopicpregnancy.com/

The AWARE Foundation: Reproductive Health and Sexuality Information
http://awarefoundation.org/


Mental Health

Hotlines:
International Suicide Helplines Directory
A gateway to 1,700 suicide helplines and emotional first-aid centers worldwide and on the Internet.
www.suicide-helplines.org/

Befrienders Worldwide
Crisis centers world-wide
http://www.befrienders.org/

Australia:
Psychiatric Emergency Team Phone
Australia Wide: 1300 555 788

Kids Help Australia
Offers a 24 hour telephone and online counseling service for children and youth throughout Australia.
Toll-free: 1-800-55-1800
http://www.kidshelp.com.au/home_KHL.aspx?s=6

Life Line
Offers a 24 hour telephone counseling service, and also a telephone advisory service dealing with mental health issues.
13-11-14
http://www.lifeline.org.au/

The Lifelink Samaritans (Tasmania)
The Lifelink Samaritans offer a 24 hour free, confidential statewide telephone befriending service; unfortunately the service is currently only available in Tasmania.
1300 364 566 (Statewide)
http://www.dhhs.tas.gov.au/services/view.php?id=2262

The Salvation Army
Offers a 24 hour telephone counseling service plus online information about depression and other problems.
1300 36 36 22
http://www.salvos.org.au/

Canada:
Kids Help Phone
Toll-free: 1-800-668-6868
Canada's only toll-free national hotline for children and youth. Bilingual (English and French).

United Kingdom and Ireland:
Bodywhys - Ireland
PO Box 105, Blackrock
County Dublin, Ireland
Phone: 01 283 4963
Helpline: 1890 200 444
http://www.bodywhys.ie/

Careline
Counselling for children, young people and adults
Phone: 020 8514 1177

CHILDLINE
Freephone: 0800 11 11
http://www.childline.org.uk/
Free, 24-hour, national helpline for children and youth in trouble or danger throughout the UK

Get Connected
Referral service, will find young people the best place that can help whatever the problem
Tel: 0808 808 4994

Relateline
Couples counselling, information and support to adults dealing with relationship issues
Phone: 0845 130 40 10

The Samaritans
24-hour, national helpline.
Phone: 08457-90-90-90 (UK)
Phone: 1850-60-90-90 (ROI)
http://www.samaritans.org/
Jo@samaritans.org

United States:
Below I've posted some of the places in the community where you can usually find low-cost counseling services or referrals for low-cost services, in addition to hotlines.

-Your local community mental health clinic:Most cities have community mental health clinic, which offers services, such as psychotherapy, group therapy, partial-day treatment programs, and medication management for individuals and families, on a sliding fee scale based on income. These clinics are staffed by mental health professionals, such as licensed clinical social workers, licensed practicing nurses, and psychiatrists, and are usually government funded.

-Your local university's teaching college/psychology program: If you don’t have a doctor you like or you want an evaluation by a mental health professional, look for local universities that have graduate programs in social work or clinical psychology. You can often get treated by graduate students who are being closely supervised, often for little cost and less than the going rates. These services are usually open to the community and are seperate from the student counseling centers, which are only open to enrolled students and facilty/staff.

-Your local university student counseling center/clinic: There's almost always a student counseling center/clinic on campuses, which offers professional counseling, for little to no cost, to enrolled students/alumini and facilty/staff.

-Employment Assistance Programs: If you are employed and your company offers an employee assistance program, take advantage of it. It’s free, and they can typically set you up with three or so sessions with a therapist (usually a licensed clinical social worker) and everything is kept confidential and completely seperate from your employment records.

-Private counseling centers: Some private counseling centers also offer variable fees, where families with limited means are charged fees based on their income and sometimes allow for a monthly payment plan.

-Your local church/synagogue/temple: Many places of worship offer spirituality-based pastoral counseling and support groups for little to no cost. The pastor/rabbi/religious leader may be a lay counselor or have additional training in mental health counseling or even a professional degree, while the support groups are usually run by lay persons.

-Your primary care doctor or gynecologist: May be able to refer you to a local mental health center for therapy, and prescribe medication to help you. Doctors may also know of psychologists who see patients on a sliding fee scale.

-Your local hospital's patient assistance program: Most hospitals provide a patient assistance program, in which the cost of services are discounted on a sliding-fee scale based on your income, and not only applies to inpatient services, but also applies to community services affiliated with the hospital or health care system, including primary care and family planning centers, pharmacies, mental health counseling, etc. To find out if your local hospital offers a patient assistance program and for details and limitations, contact your local hospital's patient accounts, patient billing, or patient advocacy office and ask about financial assistance programs for patients.

-Your local community information directory: Most communities have a community information directory operated by the local United Way or a similiar organization, with a 211 or similiar number. These directories keep a usually pretty up-to-date listing of a wide range of community-based programs.

Covenent House Nineline
This is a 24-hour, toll-free crisis hotline which provides crisis intervention, referral and information services to homeless, runaway and other troubled youth and their families throughout the U.S. With a database of over 26,000 agencies, trained crisis counselors are able to refer callers to help in their own communities.
1-800-999-9999
1-800-999-9915 TTY

Kid Help
Children and adolescents in crisis will receive immediate help. Referrals to shelters, mental health services, sexual abuse treatment, substance abuse, family counseling, residential care, adoption/foster care, etc.
1-800-543-7283

Kristin Brooks Hope Center
These are 24-hour, toll-free crisis hotlines for those facing a mental health crisis
1-800-SUICIDE (442-4673) or 1-800-442-HOPE
1-800-SUICIDA (784-2432) Hablamos Espanol
1-877-YOUTHLINE (968-8454) Teen to teen peer counseling hotline
1-800-GRADHLP (472-3457)  Grad student hotline
1-800-PPD-MOMS (773-6667) Post partum depression hotline
http://www.hopeline.com/gethelpnow.html

NAMI Helpline National Alliance for the Mentally Ill
1-800-950-NAMI (M-F, 10am-5pm, Eastern time)
http://www.nami.org/

National Eating Disorder Referral and Information Center
858-481-1515 (not toll free)
www.edreferral.com/

National Suicide Hotline
1-888-248-2587

National Self-Injury Hotline
SAFE (Self Abuse Finally Ends) Alternatives Program
http://www.selfinjury.com/
1-800-DONT CUT (1-800-366-8288)

National Teen Crisis Hotlines
http://teenadvice.about.com/cs/gethelpnow/

National Youth Crisis and Suicide Hotline (United States)
1.800.621.4000

Panic Disorder Information Hotline
1-800-64-PANIC

State-by State Suicide Hotlines Directory
National Toll-Free Hotline Number: 1-800-784-2433
24 hours / 7 days a week
http://suicidehotlines.com/

Suicide: Read This First
www.metanoia.org/suicide/

The Trevor HelpLine
Specializing in gay and lesbian youth suicide prevention
1-800-850-8078

Informational/Prevention Organizations and Websites:
Post-Partum Support International
http://www.postpartum.net/

Suicide and Mental Health Association International
http://suicideandmentalhealthassociationinternational.org/

Argentina:
AsociaciĆ³n de Lucha contra Bulimia y Anorexia
Combate de los Pozos 2193
Buenos Aires, Argentina 1245
Phone: 011 4306-0033
Toll-free: 0800 222 ALUBA
http://www.aluba.org/

Australia:
Australian Network for Promotion, Prevention and Early Intervention for Mental Health
An information site in depression and other mental health illnesses.
http://auseinet.flinders.edu.au/

Beyond Blue
Beyondblue is a national, independent, not for profit organization working to address issues associated with depression, anxiety and related substance misuse disorders in Australia. It is a good source of information about depression and its consequences. It does not offer a hotline service.
http://www.beyondblue.org.au/

DepressionNet
http://www.depressionet.com.au/

Eating Disorders Resource Centre -
53 Railway Tce
Milton, Qld, 4064
Australia
Phone: (07) 3876 2500
www.uq.net.au/eda/documents/start.html

Eating Disorders Support Network (EDSN)
PO Box 532
Willoughby NSW 2068
Phone: (02) 9412 4499
http://www.edsn.asn.au/

Mind Matters
A mental health promotional site aimed at secondary school children.
http://online.curriculum.edu.au/mindmatters/index.htm

Mood Gym
Delivers online cognitive behaviour therapy for preventing depression.
http://moodgym.anu.edu.au/

Reach Out
An online information site about depression and other mental illnesses.
http://www.reachout.com.au/home.asp

Sane
Offers a 9-5 pm EST informational telephone service plus online information about for depression sufferers wanting to re-enter the workforce.
1800 18 SANE (7263)
http://www.sane.org/

Canada:
Center for Suicide Prevention
http://www.suicideinfo.ca/

National Eating Disorders Information Centre
200 Elizabeth Street CW 1-211, Toronto, Canada
Phone: (416) 340-4156
Toll-free: 1-866-633-4220
http://www.nedic.ca/

National Eating Disorders Information Centre
Toll-free: 1-866-633-4220

Suicide Information and Education Center
http://www.siec.ca/

Norway:
Interessegruppa For Kvinner Med Spiseforstyrrelser
BOKS 8877
Youngstorget 0028
Oslo, Norway
Phone: 22 42 22 22
http://www.iks.no/

United Kingdom
BBC: Mental Health Conditions (UK)
http://www.bbc.co.uk/health/conditions/mental_health/index.shtm

Colchester Eating Disorder Support Centre
15 Queen Street
Colchester, Essex U.K.
Phone: 01206 710017
Help Line: 01206 563636
http://www.colchestereatingdisorders.org.uk/

Dealing with Sleep Problems and Insomnia
http://www.rcpsych.ac.uk/mentalhealthinformation/mentalhealthproblems/sleepproblems/sleepingwell.aspx
http://www.counselling.cam.ac.uk/insom.html

Eating Disorders Association
1st Floor, Windsor House
103 Prince of Wales Road
Norwich NR1 1DW UK
Phone: 0870 770 3256
Adult Help Line: 0845 634 1414
Youth Help Line: 0845 634 7650
Textphone: 01603 753322 (hearing impaired)
http://www.edauk.com/

Lifesigns
Support, information, and assistance for self-harmers
http://www.lifesigns.org.uk/

Making Sense of Anti-Depressants: Leaflet by mind.org
http://www.mind.org.uk/Information/Booklets/Making+sense/Making+sense+of+antidepressants.htm

Mental Health Foundation
http://www.mentalhealth.org.uk//

Royal College of Psychiatrists
Royal College of Psychiatrists - UK
17 Belgrave Square
London SW1X 8PG England
Phone: 020 7235 2351
http://www.rcpsych.ac.uk/

Stress Busting
Information and solutions for stress
http://www.stressbusting.co.uk/

United States
American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
http://www.aacap.org/

American Association of Suicidology
To understand and prevent suicide as a means of promoting human well-being.
http://www.suicidology.org/

American Foundation for Suicide Prevention
http://www.afsp.org/

American Pyschological Association
http://www.apa.org/pyschnet

American Schizophrenia Association
(800) 847-3802

Anti-Depressant Database
http://www.coreynahman.com/antidepressantdrugsdatabase.html

Anxiety Disorder Association of America
http://www.adaa.org/

Bipolar.com
Information, support, and advocacy for persons with Bipolar Disorder
http://www.bipolar.com/

BPD World
Information, support, and advocacy for those with borderline personality disorder
http://www.bpdworld.org/

Breathing Exercises for Those with Anxiety Disorders
http://www.healthyplace.com/Communities/Anxiety/treatment/diaphragmatic_breathing.asp

Center for Child and Adolescent Development
http://www.challiance.org/ccad/neuro_research/welcome.shtml

Center for Post-Partum Health
Specializes in women's mental health concerns and life cycles changes around pregnancy and birth and the onset of perinatal mood and anxiety disorders.
http://www.postpartumhealth.com/

Child and Adolescent Bipolar Foundation
http://www.bpkids.org/

The Clinical Depression Page
http://www.geocities.com/angelmuzic78/depression.html

Confidential Online Depression Screening Test
Answer a few simple questions to determine if you are experiencing depressive symptoms. Provides a referral list and information on depression.
http://www.depression-screening.org/

Dealing with Sleep Problems and Insomnia
http://www.well.com/~mick/insomnia/

Depression After Delivery
Information and referrals for women suffering from depression during pregnancy, or after pregnancy (postpartum depression/PPD). Telephone support, support groups, etc.
Toll-free: 1-800-944-4773 (1-800-944-4PPD)

Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance
http://www.dbsalliance.org/

Depression and Related Affective Disorder Association
http://www.drada.org/

Depression Fallout
This is one of the oldest internet resource for the spouses, lovers, parents, children, and friends of those who suffer from depression and bipolar disorder and it continues to be a leading source of information and support.
http://depressionfallout.com/

Depression Guide
http://www.depression-guide.com/

Eating Disorders Awareness and Prevention (EDAP)
For answers to your questions, information, and nationwide referrals.
1-800-931-2237
http://www.nationaleatingdisorders.com/

eMedicine Health: Depression
http://www.emedicinehealth.com/articles/10289-1.asp

Families for Depression Awareness
http://www.familyaware.org/

Federation of Families for Children's Mental Health
http://www.ffcmh.org/

Freedom From Fear
National nonprofit mental illness advocacy organization helping those affected by anxiety, depression and related disorders with advocacy, education, research, and community support.
http://www.freedomfromfear.org/

Friends for Survival, Inc.
A national outreach program for survivors of suicide loss.
http://www.friendsforsurvival.org/

Healthy Minds (American Psychiatric Association) Psychiatric Disorder and Topic Information
http://healthyminds.org/disorderandtopicinfo.cfm

Healthy Minds (American Psychiatric Association): Let's Talk Facts Brochures
http://healthyminds.org/letstalkfacts.cfm

Healthy Place: America's Mental Health Channel
http://www.healthyplace.com/

Living with Depression
http://www.healthyplace.com/Communities/Depression/living/index.asp

McMan's Depression and Bipolar Web
http://mcmanweb.com/

Mental Health Services Locator
www.mentalhealth.org/databases/

Mental Health Information Center
http://www.mentalhealth.samhsa.gov/suicideprevention/

Mental Health InfoSource
1-800-447-4474
http://www.mhsource.com/

Mental Help Net
Promotes mental health and wellness education and advocacy
http://mentalhelp.net/

Mental Health Today
http://www.mental-health-today.com/

MGC Center for Women's Health
Mental Health Center at Mass. General Hospital helping women suffering from mood disturbances, bipolar, anxiety, etc.
http://www.womensmentalhealth.org/

National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression (NARSAD)
http://www.narsad.org/

National Alliance on Mental Illness
http://nami.org/index.html

National Association of Anorexia Nervosa & Associated Disorders
847-831-3438

National Eating Disorders Association
http://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/

National Depressive & Manic-Depressive Association
1-800-826-3632
http://www.ndmda.org/

National Foundation for Depressive Illness
1(800) 248-4344

National Institute of Mental Health Information Line
Provides information and literature on mental illness by disorder - for professionals and general public.
1-800-647-2642
http://www.nimh.nih.gov/

National Mental Health Association
Provides free information on specific disorders, referral directory to mental health providers, national directory of local mental health associations
1-800-969-6642 (M-F, 9-5 EST)
http://www.nmha.org/

National Mental Health Services Knowledge Exchange Network
1-800-789-CMHS

OASSIS (Organization for Attempters and Survivors of Suicide in Interfaith Services)
http://www.oassis.org/

Obessive Compulsive Foundation
http://www.ocfoundation.org/

Online PPD Support Group
Offers information, support and assistance to those dealing with postpartum mood disorders, their families, friends, physicians and counselors.
http://www.ppdsupportpage.com/index.html

Pediatric Depression Experience Journals
Run by Children’s Hospital of Boston contains narratives from children with depression who have been treated at Children’s, and their parents and clinicians.
http://www.experiencejournal.com/depression/index.shtml

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Alliance
A group of professional and advocacy organizations, providing educational resources to individuals diagnosed with PTSD and their loved ones; those at risk for developing PTSD; and medical, healthcare and other frontline professionals.
http://www.ptsdalliance.org/

Pysch Central: Depression Information and Treatment
http://psychcentral.com/disorders/depression/

Psyke: Self-Injury Information and Support (Prevention/Intervention Focus)
http://www.psyke.org/

Schizophrenia - Information, Support, Education
http://www.schizophrenia.com/

Stress Busters
Information and and techniques for stress suffers
http://www.mindtools.com/smpage.html

Stress Management and Emotional Wellness Links
http://www.imt.net/~randolfi/StressLinks.html

Suicidal.com: When No One Knows Your Pain (Prevention/intervention focus)
http://www.suicidal.com/

Suicide and Suicide Prevention
http://www.psycom.net/depression.central.suicide.html

Suicide Awareness Voices of Education (SAVE)
http://www.save.org/

Suicide Grief Support Forum
A support site by and for those who've lost friends and loved ones to suicide.
http://www.suicidegrief.com/

Suicide Prevention Action Network USA (SPAN USA)
http://www.spanusa.org/

Suicide Prevention Resource Center
http://www.sprc.org/

TheSite.org: Mental Health and Wellbeing
General website detailing information on mental health issues including self-harm, depression, anxiety, and BDD.
http://www.thesite.org/healthandwellbeing/mentalhealth

WebMD: Depression
http://my.webmd.com/medical_information/condition_centers/depression/default.htm

What Can I Do?
If someone you know is considering suicide. From the Canadian Association of Suicide Prevention.
http://www3.sympatico.ca/masecard/what.html

Wings of Madness Depression Guide
http://www.wingofmadness.com/index.htm

Women's Garden of Self Esteem
http://www.angelfire.com/psy/esteem/index.html

Yellow Ribbon Suicide Prevention Program
1-800-SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433)
1-800-999-9999
http://www.yellowribbon.org/


Runaway Children/Teens Helplines

Hotlines:
Australia
Kids Help Line
Toll-free: 1-800-55-1800
24-hour toll-free hotline for children and youth throughout Australia.

Canada:
Kids Help Phone
Toll-free: 1-800-668-6868
Canada's only toll-free national hotline for children and youth. Bilingual (English and French).

nited Kingdom
CHILDULINE UK
Freephone: 0800 11 11
http://www.childline.org.uk/  
Free, 24-hour, national helpline for children and youth in trouble or danger throughout the UK.

Get Connected
Referral service, will find young people the best place that can help whatever the problem
Phone: 0808 808 4994

Careline
Counselling for children, young people and adults
Phone: 020 8514 1177

United States
National Runaway Switchboard
Provides crisis intervention and travel assistance to runaways. Gives referrals to shelters nationwide. Also relays messages to, or sets up conference calls with, parents at the request of the child. Has access to AT&T-Language Line.
1-800-621-0394
TDD (for hearing-impaired): 1-800-621-4000
24-hour crisis line, referrals to shelters, food, counseling, travel assistance.
http://www.nrscrisisline.org/

Covenent House Nineline
This is a 24-hour, toll-free crisis hotline which provides crisis intervention, referral and information services to homeless, runaway and other troubled youth and their families throughout the U.S. With a database of over 26,000 agencies, trained crisis counselors are able to refer callers to help in their own communities.
1-800-999-9999
1-800-999-9915 TTY

Kid Help
Children and adolescents in crisis will receive immediate help. Referrals to shelters, mental health services, sexual abuse treatment, substance abuse, family counseling, residential care, adoption/foster care, etc.
1-800-543-7283

National Center for Missing and Exploited Children
National Hotline: 1-800-THE-LOST
www.ncmec.org/

Youth Crisis Hotline
1-800-HIT-HOME
Services for runaway/homeless youth, referrals to resources for abuse, crisis counseling.

Informational/Prevention Organizations and Websites:


Safe Infant Abandonment

Hotlines:
United States:
AMT Children of Hope Foundation
Toll-free: 1-877-796-4673
Nationwide 24 hour crisis line. Confidential referrals to "Safe Havens" and professional services.

Project Cuddle, Baby Rescue Program
Toll-free: 1-888-628-3353
Nationwide 24 hour crisis line. All calls are confidential and they will help you find a safe, legal alternative to abandonment.

Safe Place for Newborns
Toll Free Crisis Hotline: 1-877-440-2229
Will provide list of hospitals in Minnesota and Wisconsin which accept healthybabies up to three days old, with no questions asked. Will provide
information on other states with "Safe Place" programs.


STI (Sexually Transmitted Infection)/HIV Information, Testing, and Treatment

Hotlines:
Africa:
HIV/AIDS Hotline South Africa
Phone: 011 0800 012 322

HIV/AIDS Hotline Nigeria
Phone: 01 772 2200 or 01 773 2201

Australia:
Albion Street Centre
150 - 154 Albion Street
Surrey Hills, NSW 2101 Australia
Phone: (02) 9332 9600
www.sesahs.nsw.gov.au/albionstcentre
Albion Street Centre is the only major Australian multidisciplinary centre dealing exclusively with HIV, AIDS, and Hepatitis-C.

United Kingdom:
AIDS FONDS
Keizersgracht 390 - 392, 1015 GB
Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Phone: 020 62 62 669
http://www.aidsfonds.nl/
Original Dutch HIV/AIDS charity offers financial, social, and psychosocial assistance for persons with HIV or AIDS, and information in Dutch and English.

AIDS Map
Lincoln House
1 Brixton Road
London, SW9 6DE
United Kingdom
Phone: 020 7840 0050
http://www.aidsmap.com/
Info regarding AIDS and its treatment, including referrals to free HIV/AIDS clinics throughout the U.K.

Get Connected
Referral service, will find young people the best place that can help whatever the problem
Phone: 0808 808 4994

Sexwise
Confidential help for under 18’s on anything to do with sex, relationships and contraception
Freephone: 0800 28 29 30

United States:
HIV Testing FAQs and Testing Site Locator
http://www.hivtest.org/

CDC National STD Hotline
Provides STD information and referrals to clinics nationwide.
www.ashastd.org/NSTD/index.html

National Herpes Hotline
Provides herpes information and referrals to clinics or support groups.
www.ashastd.org/hrc/index.html

CDC National AIDS Hotline 1-800-342-AIDS (2437) English
1-800-344-7432 Espanol
1-800-243-7889 Deaf Access (TTY)
(24 hours, 7 days a week)
www.ashastd.org/nah/index.html

Teens and AIDS Hotline
1-800-440-TEEN

Project Inform
(treatment info.)
1-800-822-7422
http://www.projinf.org/

Home Access home test
1-800-HIV-TEST

Covenent House Nineline
This is a 24-hour, toll-free crisis hotline which provides crisis intervention, referral and information services to homeless, runaway and other troubled youth and their families throughout the U.S. With a database of over 26,000 agencies, trained crisis counselors are able to refer callers to help in their own communities.
1-800-999-9999
1-800-999-9915 TTY

Kid Help
Children and adolescents in crisis will receive immediate help. Referrals to shelters, mental health services, sexual abuse treatment, substance abuse, family counseling, residential care, adoption/foster care, etc.
1-800-543-7283

Informational/Prevention Organizations and Websites:
National Minority AIDS Council
1931 13th Street, NW
Washington D.C. 20009
202-483-6622 (not toll-free)

AIDS & Adolescents Network
666 Broadway, Ste. 520
New York, NY 10012

Informational/Prevention Organizations and Websites:
United States:
Avert Foundation - Information HIV/AIDS and STDs and Prevention
http://www.avert.org/

Healthy Minds (American Psychiatric Association) Fact Sheets: Coping with AIDS and HIV
http://healthyminds.org/copingwithaidsandhiv.cfm



Last  Updated: 2-14-11